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Air freight peak season: it’s not all up in the air

Air freight peak season: it’s not all up in the air

Blog posts   •   Aug 20, 2018 17:27 GMT

The air freight peak season is around the corner and everyone is getting ready, but capacity alone will not save the day this year, smooth operations on the ground will be equally important.

Air freight on steroids

Air freight on steroids

Blog posts   •   Jul 06, 2018 12:55 GMT

E-commerce is the fastest growing sector driving global air freight volumes. Panalpina's global head of Air Freight, Lucas Kuehner, explains Panalpina's approach to air freight for e-commerce, and what it takes to be successful in that business where nothing can go wrong - while making sure that regular air freight customers do not lose out on capacity come the peak season.

New York – with a touch of Chicago

New York – with a touch of Chicago

Blog posts   •   Jan 26, 2017 08:00 GMT

Chicago is not New York. Evidently. So last year, when Panalpina decided to serve its JFK air freight customers from its Chicago office, it created a bit of a stir. People asked: Are you shutting everything down at JFK? Will you do no more air freight out of New York? Well, five months down the road, quite the opposite is the case.

Trouble in Happy Valley-Goose Bay

Trouble in Happy Valley-Goose Bay

Blog posts   •   Dec 22, 2016 11:00 GMT

With the 76 ton subsea tree successfully loaded and secured in the hold beneath him, loadmaster Yrii Rudko’s job was done for now. Sitting in the cabin at the back of the An-124, seat belt fastened, he could feel how 400 tons of mighty flying equipment and cargo accelerated down runway 34 at Senai International Airport in Malaysia. This is part III of Panalpina's "Christmas tree" story.

“Difficult, but still possible”

“Difficult, but still possible”

Blog posts   •   Dec 20, 2016 07:00 GMT

On the fourth loading attempt everything finally came into place and gone were the worry lines in the faces of everyone involved: The Christmas tree for the Caribbean was correctly positioned inside the aircraft. It had been inched past the most critical section right under the cockpit of the An-124, where the maximum vertical clearance is 4400 mm. Every single one of these millimeters was needed.